DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — The biggest winner in the aftermath of Stephen F. Austin's shocking upset of No. 1 Duke might be the fundraising effort for the family of the player who hit the game-winning layup.

A thankful Nathan Bain was still in "disbelief" Wednesday — about the contributions more than his clutch basket.

Since the end of the game, the two-month-old GoFundMe page set up to help Bain's family rebuild from Hurricane Dorian damage had raised $62,189 and counting at 2:30 p.m. EST Wednesday. It's a massive spike from the roughly $2,000 it had raised before Tuesday night's stunning result became the talk of college basketball.

Bain said Wednesday that the donation totals had "skyrocketed" when he checked the website several times after the game.

"I was just in disbelief at what basketball had done for my family," the 6-foot-6, fifth-year senior guard told the Associated Press by phone. "It was truly a blessing."

The initial fundraising goal of $25,000 was increased to $50,000 — only to have it, too, surpassed by early in the afternoon.

GoFundMe spokeswoman Aja Shepherd said the Bain family site was the second-most popular campaign Wednesday — surpassed only by one for victims of an earthquake in Albania that had killed at least 30 and injured more than 650 — with more than 1,500 donors from all 50 states giving an average of $36.

Bain said his family "lost everything inside" its single-story home in Freeport, Grand Bahama. His father Norris, a minister, runs the Tabernacle Baptist Church, which Nathan said has "a couple hundred" congregants and an affiliated K-12 school with an enrollment of about 800. Both suffered severe damage from the Category 5 storm that hammered the islands, with their home and the church "gutted."

Bahamas-Sports Relief Basketball

In this Sept. 27, 2019 file photo a basketball board is seen next to a car among the debris left by Hurricane Dorian, in a neighborhood destroyed by the storm in Abaco, Bahamas. Any concern about whether it was appropriate to be playing sports in the Bahamas while parts of the multi-island nation continue to recover from the effects of the storm was quickly dispelled by officials. Officials are hoping tourism and upcoming sporting events aid recovery efforts by boosting the economy to pay for reconstruction and raising awareness for people to donate or volunteer for ongoing work. Participants in those events _ including the eight-team Atlantis tournament opening Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019 are also helping in the recovery. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Dorian hammered the northern Abaco and Grand Bahama islands before giving a glancing blow to the southeastern United States. There were 67 confirmed deaths and 282 people were still missing as of late October along with $3.4 billion in losses for the Bahamas, according to a recent report.

"We just want to make sure we get the people around us taken care of at the church, at the school," Nathan Bain said. "That's really our main focus, to make sure everyone has a place to worship and to make sure the school is taken care of so these kids can get a proper education."

Bain scored on a breakaway layup just before the overtime buzzer to give the Nacogdoches, Texas-based school an 85-83 victory that sent shock waves through the sport, ending the Blue Devils' 150-game winning streak at Cameron Indoor Stadium against nonconference opponents — a run that extended nearly 20 years.

The upset that put the spotlight on the post-Dorian relief efforts came the night before the Battle 4 Atlantis tournament was to tip off in Paradise Island, Bahamas. Participants in the eight-team tournament — which includes No. 6 North Carolina and No. 13 Seton Hall — are assisting recovery efforts, with UNC senior Brandon Robinson leading a donation drive and Seton Hall raising money for hurricane relief.

Meanwhile, roughly 12 hours after pulling off the memorable upset against overwhelming odds, the Lumberjacks were back in East Texas on Wednesday morning distributing meals to the homeless for Thanksgiving — a project that was pre-planned, no matter the outcome at Duke.

"We have so much that the school gives us," Bain said, "it's only right that we give something back."

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