CLAIM: Videos show cyclone hitting Karachi, Pakistan.

Pakistan Weather

Boats of Pakistani fishermen were brought ashore in Pakistan's coastal area of Karachi, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. The Pakistan Meteorological Department warned fishermen against venturing deep into the sea and said that, under the storm's influence, rain is expected in lower Sindh and the Makran Coast. Pakistani authorities issued a warning for Cyclonic Storm 'Kyarr.' (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)

THE FACTS: The videos of Cyclone Kyarr were shot in Oman, hundreds of miles from Karachi. One Twitter user falsely claimed that the video of a wave flooding a road that he shared on Oct. 28 showed "#Karachi embracing the might of cyclone #Kyarr." In fact, the video was shot in Al Batinah in Oman. The Times of Oman tweeted the same video of the wave minutes earlier stating that it was filmed in Saham, a coastal town in the Al Batinah region. A geolocation search on Google Earth confirmed that the footage matched Saham's waterfront.

Another video capturing t

he cyclone's impact in Muttra, Oman, was tweeted on Oct. 31 with a false caption locating the footage in Karachi. In the tweet, the user describes the video as "Karachi see view," with "sea" apparently misspelled. The video shows a massive wave crashing over the corniche in the evening, flooding the street and knocking people down. Haitham Al-Sinani had first published that video on Snapchat, identifying the location as Muttrah, a district in Muscat, Oman. Al-Sinani confirmed to the AP in a phone call that he filmed the video in Muttrah on Oct. 29. The corniche captured in the video also matches Muttrah's corniche, specifically the golden domes along the promenade.

Both of the videos were also shared on Facebook with false captions. Cyclone Kyarr formed in the Arabian Sea last week hitting parts of Oman, according to the India Meteorological Department. The storm weakened into a depression on Nov. 1. Multiple outlets reported that Cyclone Kyarr was not a direct threat to Karachi.

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This is part of The Associated Press' ongoing effort to fact-check misinformation that is shared widely online, including work with Facebook to identify and reduce the circulation of false stories on the platform.

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